Battle of Port Hudson

USCT recruitment-broadside_2 (1)

USCT at Port Hudson Courtesy of the National Archives

9th Regiment Infantry

Organized at Port Hudson, La., September 2, 1863. Attached to Ullman’s Brigade, Corps de Afrique, Dept. of the Gulf, to December, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Corps de Afrique, to March, 1864. Garrison, Port Hudson, to April, 1864.

SERVICE.–Garrison duty at Port Hudson, La., until April, 1864. Designation of Regiment changed to 81st United States Colored Troops April 4, 1864.

81st Regiment Infantry

Organized April 4, 1864, from 9th Corps de Afrique Infantry. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Corps de Afrique, Dept. of the Gulf, to July, 1864. Consolidated with 88th and 89th United States Colored Troops July 6, 1864, to form new 77th United States Colored Troops. Reorganized July, 1864, by consolidation of 87th and 95th United States Colored Troops. Attached to Engineer Brigade, Dept. of the Gulf, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, United States Colored Troops, Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1865. Garrison of Port Hudson, La., Dept. of the Gulf, to July, 1865. Dept. of the Gulf to January, 1866.

SERVICE.–Post and garrison duty at Port Hudson, La., and in the Dept. of the Gulf entire term. Mustered out January 30, 1866.

port_hudson1

Heart of Louisiana: Battle of Port Hudson – FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports. (LINK)

memorial Vilmont Schexnayder

Sons & Daughters United States Colored Troop

The Sons and Daughters of the United States Colored Troops (S&DUSCT) is chartered by the African-American Civil War Memorial Freedom Foundation(AACWMFF) (LINK) to augment the Foundation’s mission to use the high visibility of the National Monument ” the Spirit of Freedom ” and the names of 209, 143 U.S. Colored Troops to change the way American History is taught and to motivate young people, especially African-Americans, to civic pride and patriotism on a national basis.

15 January 2010: A Friend Of Friends: Lessons From The Underground Railroad Sandra T

By Sandra Taliaferro

One night during the holidays I watched one of my favorite movies, Roots: The Gift. The movie stars LeVar Burton and Louis Gossett, Jr., in their roles as Kunta Kinte and Fiddler from the television series Roots. In this movie, Kunta and Fiddler accompany their owner to another plantation at Christmas time for a party, and become involved in a plan to help some runaway slaves escape via the Underground Railroad to freedom. A simple, yet powerful story. There are many messages and lessons to be learned from Roots: The Gift.In one of my favorite scenes, Fiddler and Kunta are helping the group of runaway slaves get to the river where they are to meet a boat that will take them further on their journey to freedom. Along the way they make a stop to pick up other “passengers” on the Underground Railroad. When they come to a farmhouse, Kunta approaches and knocks. The man asks…”who goes”? Kunta responds “Friend of Friends”…in acknowledgment, the man replies “Friend of Friends”. A group of “passengers” exit the house. Kunta, Fiddler, and the group continue their journey.This year, I was particularly moved by the Underground Railroad scene, and even more so by the phrase uttered by Kunta- Friend of Friends. The phrase, and variations of it, was used along the Underground Railroad as a password or signal to those assisting runaway slaves on their journey North…to freedom. The traditional response to the “who goes there” password is said to have been “A Friend of a Friend”.A Friend of Friends. Say it… A Friend of Friends, again…A Friend of Friends. It evokes such a comforting, welcoming feeling. A feeling of trust, of sharing, of caring, of kindness, and of friendship, however brief. At the same time, it is transient…adjusting and changing with the circumstances. I’m A Friend of Friends….you don’t know me, but I require assistance…I need your help, and guidance…some information to aid me on my journey…then I’ll be moving on…to the next stop along the way.The phrase, and the underlying concept, seems particularly appropriate and relevant for those of us in the genealogy community; aren’t we all on some level really just A Friend of Friends? Strangers helping strangers. Friends of friends with a common bond that ties us all together….the desire to know our ancestors, and to tell their stories. A common goal, with different methods, different paths that cross and intersect along the journey. As we travel this road to uncovering our ancestors and their stories we should all embrace the concept…we should be A Friend of Friends. Don’t be afraid or reluctant to share, to care, to guide, or to assist your fellow researcher along their journey.As an African American researcher my task is two-fold; I research my family, but inevitably I must also research the family of my ancestor’s slave holders if I want to know more about my roots. Often we must seek information (assistance) from those that we do not know to aid us on our journey. It is an unavoidable truth – the descendants of our ancestor’s slave holding families may hold the key to our enslaved ancestor’s past. Slavery is an ugly truth of our shared history. I am not angry with you because your ancestor held my ancestor as a slave; don’t be angry with me because I seek those records that may shed more light on the lives of my people, and help me to tell their story more completely. Some who were members of slave holding families assisted passengers along the Underground Railroad. I challenge you to be A Friend of Friends.We, as researchers of our African American ancestry, must also remember to share, to care, to guide, and to assist our fellow researchers; reach out, take time….no, make time. Can you request and expect the assistance of others, yet not expect the same of yourself? I urge you to stop being selfish with your research. Don’t miss out on a connection or a long lost cousin because of fear or uncertainty. Post It, Blog It, Share It, and Publish It. Many who were passengers along the Underground Railroad returned to assist others on their journey to freedom. I challenge you to be A Friend of Friends.True genealogists know all of this, and understand the necessity of it. Indeed, the concept is nothing new in the genealogy community. Random, and not so random, acts of kindness occur every day. So, consider this a wake-up call, my challenge to you. When a fellow researcher comes calling…for info…for guidance…for knowledge…for support – be there – to share, to care, to guide, and to assist.KNOCK, KNOCK!?!WHO GOES THERE?A FRIEND OF FRIENDSSHARE THIS:

via 15 January 2010: A Friend Of Friends: Lessons From The Underground Railroad.

23andMe DNA confirmed Muggah-Payne connection

Cynthia July 14, 2012, I started  corresponding with my new cousin  S.  Buckner on Ancestry.com. His great-great-grandmother is Cynthia Muggah Payne. She is the sister of my great-grandfather Milton Muggah. S. Buckner is one of several newly met cousins that I correspond from Ancestry.com and Facebook. My adult sons would teased me about talking to strangers. But I would say they are not strangers they are my cousins, we just didn’t know each other for a couple of decades due to families moving away from Patterson, Louisiana, the Bayou Teche (Tesh) Well S. Buckner recently did the 23andMe DNA test. It confirmed that I and S. Buckner were cousins. We share DNA from Cynthia’s and Milton’s parents. The DNA could have been from mother Arabella Harper or the presumed father Muggah. I think S. Buckner was took back, when I said it was official, because in reality we already felt that we were cousins, it is the genealogist in us. But today as I was looking at the Facebook cousins that S. Buckner introduced to me last year, which I don’t talk to them on the same level as I do with S. Buckner…I saw them as my cousins…we share a 3rd or 4th great-grandparent. Cynthia and Rev. John Payne had about 8 known children.

Arabella Rosie Payne 1875

Cynthia Payne 1878

Evelina Payne 1880

Ella Payne 1882

John M Payne Jr. 1884

Nathaniel J Payne 1887

Earl Erastaus Payne 1889 – 1971

Theophius T Payne 1891 – 1965

Rosie

Cynthia’s daughter Arabella Roxie Payne born 1875

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              E. Payne

Cynthia’s son  Earl Erastaus Payne born  23 Jun 1889 in Patterson Louisiana. He worked in the Saw Mill for several years.  Earl married Allie Virginia Murphy. They had children Helen, Earl, Ada, Landon and Alice. Earl Erastaus Payne moved the family Flint Michigan by 1924.

Murphy

Earl’s wife Allie Murphy as a child.

                                                                                               Buckner2                                                                                                    Buckner 1

                      Helen and her brother Earl Murphy Payne

Photos courtesy of S. Buckner                                                                                 

AAGSAR New Kids On The Blog

To Our Ancestors,

… we stand before you now, your living legacy, the flesh and blood of our collective dreaming, and we realize with a knowing deeper than the flow of human blood in human veins that we are part of something better, truer, deeper.

We speak your names.
We speak your names.

“We Speak Your Names” Pearl Cleage, pg. 15

AAGSAR: You Got Roots? – New Kids On The Blog

We Speak Your Names” Pearl Cleage, Contributing Guest Blogger Kristin Cleage of Finding Eliza