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Tag Archives: Vilmont Schexnayder

Haydel and Muggah

It is the year 2015 and I am still busy researching. With constant communication on 23andme, Gedmatch.com, Ancestry.com and Facebook, it appears I am neglecting my blog.

This past month I have posted that Ambroise Heidel is my 7th great grandfather. Vilmont Schexnayder’s 3rd great grandfather.The Whitney Plantation, originally known as Habitation Haydel, is located less than an hour from New Orleans, on the historic River Road in Wallace, Louisiana. Ambroise Heidel (1702-ca.1770), the founder of this plantation, emigrated from Germany to Louisiana with his mother and siblings in 1721. The plantation has been in the news lately due to the museum has been remodeled to make slavery the central focus.
I am also taking the time to read books in my busy schedule. I am reading at this time a book call Bouki Fait Gombo: A History of the Slave Community of Habitation Haydel (Whitney Plantation) Louisiana, 1750-1860 by Ibrahima Seck. The book mentions the Haydels, Schexnayders and the Roussels. If you recalled from earlier postings the Roussels were the last slave holder of Vilmont Schexnayder.

Whitney plantation whitney-plantation

This past January, I finally verified my lineage to James Milne Muggah Sr. Born about 1785 in Facteabers in Barissehore, Scotland and moved to Patterson Louisiana. A direct descendant of James Milne Muggah’s granddaughter Margaret Mackey Muggah, also did his DNA testing through 23andme. My new found cousins were gracious enough to share a picture of the homestead and the picture of Jame Milne Muggah Jr. It has been a great to find my European lineage with extended roots, but I still feel compel to find which son of James Sr. is my direct lineage and still have Arabella’s parents to find. At least I have Arabella’s name, unlike Vilmont’s mother.

JamesMuggah_hm,jpg (3)

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“Slavery is not a shame on me, my ancestors were some of the most creative and enduring people.”

“Slavery is not a shame on me, my ancestors were some of the most creative and enduring people.” a quote from “Many Rivers to Cross” PBS special.

Vilmont real

I look at this picture and think that Louisiana wanted everybody to believed that Vilmont was not human, born as property. He was not a Mandingo in statue, since he was not of breeded stock. His White father did not claim him like the free people of color was accustomed to.  He was a slave on a Perique tobacco plantation and a sugar plantation He worked hard from sun up to sun down. When he was 23 years old he was valued at one thousand dollars…He was not the top dollar item…Did he work in the house?…I don’t know…but I do know the house Negro worked as hard..don’t believe the myth that the house Negro had it made. They did not stay in the house in comfort. But I don’t know if he was a house Negro or field Negro, but I do know that he was given a slave quarter after the war, was it the same one he had lived in before the war?.. I don’t know…but his ex-master allowed him to live in an ex slave quarter and share crop on the property.

Vilmont price3

Vilmont is the six name down. Vilmont was a named property in the settlement of the estate of George Roussel on January 28th 1859. He was passed down to his son Louis Amedee Roussel.

recruitment-broadside_2

Vilmont ran off Louis Roussel’s plantation and joined the United States Colored Troop. He did return after the war to Louis Roussel’s plantation.

81st Regiment,

United States Colored Infantry

COMPANY:K SOLDIER’S

RANK IN:Corporal SOLDIER’S

RANK OUT:Private

FILM NUMBER:M589 roll 77 NOTES: REFERENCE CARD. Original filed under Belmont/Seching Belomont Sechnight.

When the enlistment officer asked for Vilmont Schexnayder’s name, this is what he heard coming out of Vilmont’s mouth, “Belmont Sechnight”  Vilmont said that during roll call, he answered to that name, since no one else was stepping up to the name, he said “It must be me.”

memorial

Vilmont was honored with the other African-American Civil War soldiers. His name is on a plaque at the African-American Civil War Memorial, at the corner of Vermont Avenue, 10th St, and U Street NW in Washington, D.C.

I am not ashamed of this man nor any other ancestors who were bought and sold as properties. I give them all the reverence, starting with the ancestors on that Trans-Atlantic boat to the ones that finally heard that “We are Free”.

 

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